Computational Mechanics for Impact and Penetration Modeling


Professor J. S. Chen and his students are working with the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center to develop a multiscale reproducing kernel particle method (RKPM) formulation to model impact and penetration into brittle materials.

Professor J. S. Chen and his students are working with the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center to develop a multiscale reproducing kernel particle method (RKPM) formulation to model impact and penetration into brittle materials. By developing a semi-Lagrangian stabilized nodal integration formulation, key phenomena such as multi-body contact, material fragmentation, and large material flow are accurately modeled. The multiscale formulation provides a critical link between microstructure failure and macroscale damage, leading to improved modeling of material softening and failure, which is crucial in penetration events. Similar numerical techniques have also been applied to metal forming and earth-moving simulations that are difficult to be modeled by the mesh based finite element methods.

 
 
 
 
 
 

  3-Bullet Penetration Experiment and Simulation

3-Bullet Penetration ‎‎(Experiment)‎‎

3-Bullet Penetration (Numerical Modeling View 2)


 

  Penetration Simulation using Quasi-Linear RKPM

Penetration Simulation using Quasi-Linear RKPM

 
 
 
Computational Fracture Mechanics

Fracture Simulation (Tensile Loading)

RKPM Fracture Simulation ‎‎‎‎‎‎‎(Tensile Loading)‎‎‎‎‎‎‎

 
 

Fracture Simulation (Shear Loading)

RKPM Fracture Simulation ‎‎(Shear Loading)‎‎

 
 

Sandia Fracture Challenge

RKPM Simulation Result ‎(Sandia Fracture Challenge)‎

 
 
 
 
Computational Geomechanics
 
 

Earth Moving Simulation

Excavation Simulation

Earth Moving Simulation using Quasi Linear RKPM

RKPM modeling of earth excavation

 
 

Slope Instability Simulation

Landslide Simulation

RKPM modeling of slope instability ‎(view 02)‎

RKPM Modeling of Landslide Under San Fernando Earthquake*

 * Courtesy of Professor Pai-Chen Guan, National Taiwan Ocean University
 
 
 
Computational Biomechanics
 
 

Isometric Contraction Process of Human Medial Gastrocnemius 

Isometric Contraction Process of Human Medial Gastrocnemius

The video shows the results of meshfree simulation of the isometric contraction process of human medial gastrocnemius (MG) in the lower leg, where the color code represents the normal stress along the muscle. The model is constructed using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) images, from which the geometry of MG is segmented and the pixel points are directly used as meshfree nodes in simulation. An anisotropic hyperelastic model is used to represent the muscle material and DTI (diffusion tensor imaging) images are used to provide the muscle fiber directions for the material model. Two ends of the MG are fixed to perform isometric contraction.